Salk to Get $21M for HIV Study

The 21 million dollar grant will focus on AIDS when it first hits the body.

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    Researchers in Thailand found that two vaccines, which had proven previously ineffective, when combined cut the risk of HIV infection by more than 31 percent for 16,000 participants in a study

    A local research group won a $21 million grant to study HIV. 

    The grant from the National Institutes of Health will be used to study the immune system's response to the early stages of HIV infection. 

    The project will draw on the expertise of 13 researchers at seven institutions.

    According to our media partner, the North County TimesJohn Young, Ph.D., a professor at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, and Sumit Chanda, Ph.D., an associate professor at the Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute will lead the group.

    Three other San Diego researchers are on the team: Alexander Hoffmann, Michael David and Leor Weinberger who hail from UCSD.

    “More traditional approaches have relied upon investigating the roles played by single genes or individual cellular pathways, " said  Young who is the director of the Nomis Foundation Laboratories for Immunobiology and Microbial Pathogenesis at the Salk Institute.

    "While these studies have borne some fruit, they only uncover small pieces of a highly interconnected network,” he said. 

    The grant will help researchers take a more holistic approach to watching how the virus affects humans when the infection is newly introduced to the body.

    Read more in the full article in the North County Times.