Sharon Stone Seeks Protection in Negligence Case

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    NEWSLETTERS

    FilmMagic
    WASHINGTON - DECEMBER 06: Actress Sharon Stone arrives to the 32nd Kennedy Center Honors at Kennedy Center Hall of States on December 6, 2009 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Paul Morigi/FilmMagic) *** Local Caption *** Sharon Stone

    As trial nears of a negligence lawsuit filed against Sharon Stone by a man who alleges he was injured during a fall at her home, the actress is asking a judge for protection from possible threats and invasion of her privacy.

    Peter Krause sued Stone in Los Angeles Superior Court in August 2008, claiming he tumbled down a ``large, concealed drop-off'' while installing speakers in the back yard of the property two years earlier. Trial is scheduled July 5.

    ``I am very concerned that during the course of this case my home address and the location of the property might be publicly disclosed in court records (or) during court proceedings,'' the actress states in a sworn declaration. ``I believe that the public disclosure of the location of my residence would expose me to safety and security risks.''

    Stone also says her past experiences guide her in her concerns.

    ``I have had several frightening experiences with stalkers, delusional individuals and others threatening to harm me in the past and I therefore take security and safety issues very seriously,'' she says. ``I have been informed by professionals that some unbalanced individuals engage in this type of threatening behavior because they seek notoriety and that public reports of incidents involving stalkers can also inspire copycat behavior.''

    The actress says she tries to balance her professional and private lives. ``I understand that when I am out in public I am often followed by paparazzi,'' Stone states. ``However, I strive to maintain my privacy around and at my residence. I live with my three young children on a quiet street in a low-profile community. Stone says that if her address is made public it could fall into the hands of ``unbalanced individuals or individuals wishing to cause me harm.''

    Her attorneys also are seeking to prevent Krause's lawyers from presenting testimony that the actress did not have a permit for a chain link fence at the rear of her property. They say the information is irrelevant and would be prejudicial.

    Krause maintains he fell onto the fence and that it gave way, causing him to tumble into the adjoining property. Stone, 53, is perhaps best known for her role in the 1992 film, ``Basic Instinct.''