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Going Grey in December

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    ILIMANAQ, GREENLAND � AUGUST 27, 2007: (ISRAEL OUT) A whale's tail rises from the sea as it swims, near the village of Ilimanaq, August 27, 2007 , Greenland. Scientists believe that Greenland, with its melting ice caps and disappearing glaciers, is an accurate thermometer of global warming. (Photo by Uriel Sinai/Getty Images)

    Bring on the Greys: December means different things to different people; for many it is the beginning of whale watching season.  If that's something you've always wanted to do but didn't because you were afraid of getting seasick, there may be a solution found only in America - or, to be more exact "on" America.

    American Pride: In this case, "America" is the 139-foot sailing schooner that is operated as part of the San Diego Maritime Museum.  She's an exact replica of the famous racing yacht that got International yacht racing started way back in 1870 - you know, the America's Cup, as in Dennis Conner, who just happens to be part owner of this modern-day version.

    No Bags Required: On December 11, America begins its four-month whale watching season, venturing out as far as 12 miles offshore so you can view the grey whales as they migrate from Alaska, past San Diego's coastline, bound for the warmer waters of Baja.  Like many operators, America guarantees that you'll see at least one whale on your voyage, but then they go a step further by promising you won't get seasick while on board.  If you do, you get your money back.

    How's this possible?  America's Director of Sales and Marketing, Warren Allan says it's a case of what you see and what you don't, "What we bring to the industry is a very large, low profile sailing vessel upon which the typical seasick motion is reduced considerably by the huge underwater keel.  The 11-foot deep keel is there to counter-balance the wind in the sails which severely reduces the rolling motion of a yacht:"

    Find out all you need to know, about America and whale watching in general, on their website.