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It's the Housing, Stupid

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It's the Housing, Stupid

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Property Taxes Rise Despite Falling Home Prices So you're home is worth less than half it once was -- but you're about to fork more over to the county for living in it. The county assessor's office predicts that property taxes will increase for about 75 percent of San Diego homeowners this year. As is the case every year, most owners' bills will go up 2 percent to reflect the current inflation rate. Unlike other years, of course, property values have dropped in most communities. The increase in taxes will mean about $91 million of additional income to the county, cities and school districts.

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One number leaps out from a new study on the impact of the housing industry on the California economy: 80 percent. That, according to by the Center for Strategic Economic Research and the California Homebuilding Foundation, is the decline in the economic impact of housing between 2005 and 2009; from $67.7 billion in direct economic activity and more than 400,000 jobs to $13.8 billion and 77,000 jobs.

The hard part is what those numbers mean for California now. To restore its economy, should California governments and investors try to rebuild that giant housing sector? Or would such a build-up only lead to another crash?

In other words, does California need a new economic model?

It's an important question, and one that's not being answered by political leadership or by the state's scholars. (The most popular answer -- jobs in an expanding green industry of energy efficient technologies -- is only a very small part of a potential answer).

Either way, it's unlikely -- and probably undesirable -- to have the housing sector grow back to its 2005 size. So something needs to replace that economic activity and jobs. But what?

Let us know what you think. Comment below, send us your thoughts via Twitter @PropZero or add your comment to our Facebook page.

Related Topics Jobs, Cash, Housing, California
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